Tornado Preparedness

“Tornado, you say..?”

Yep,  I say.

Did you know there was a Tornado Warning in Orange County today?  The storm passing through California has not only the ability to cause Mudslides and flooding, but may be powerful enough to produce a tornado…even in Santa Cruz County.  Knowing what to do in a tornado can be the difference between life and death.  So, because we care, here’s a quick cram on what to do during a tornado, in the unlikely event of a Watch or Warning here in Santa Cruz County.

Tornado Preparedness

A tornado is a violently rotating column of air extending from the base of a thunderstorm down to the ground. Tornado intensities are classified on the Fujita Scale with ratings between F0 (weakest) to F5 (strongest). They are capable of completely destroying well-made structures, uprooting trees and hurling objects through the air like deadly missiles. Although severe tornadoes are more common in the Plains States, tornadoes have been reported in every state.
Know the Difference

Tornado Watch
Tornadoes are possible in and near the watch area. Review and discuss your emergency plans, and check supplies and your safe room. Be ready to act quickly if a warning is issued or you suspect a tornado is approaching. Acting early helps to save lives!

Tornado Warning
A tornado has been sighted or indicated by weather radar. Tornado warnings indicate imminent danger to life and property. Go immediately under ground to a basement, storm cellar or an interior room (closet, hallway or bathroom) and Duck and Cover (just like you would in an Earthquake).

What should I do to prepare for a tornado?
  • During any storm, listen to local news or a NOAA Weather Radio to stay informed about watches and warnings.
  • Know your community’s warning system. Communities have different ways of warning residents about tornados, with many having sirens intended for outdoor warning purposes.
  • Pick a safe room in your home where household members and pets may gather during a tornado. This should be a basement, storm cellar or an interior room on the lowest floor with no windows.
  • Practice periodic tornado drills so that everyone knows what to do if a tornado is approaching.
  • Consider having your safe room reinforced. Plans for reinforcing an interior room to provide better protection can be found on the FEMA Web site athttp://www.fema.gov/plan/prevent/rms/rmsp453.shtm.
  • Prepare for high winds by removing diseased and damaged limbs from trees.
  • Move or secure lawn furniture, trash cans, hanging plants or anything else that can be picked up by the wind and become a projectile.
  • Watch for tornado danger signs:
    • Dark, often greenish clouds-a phenomenon caused by hail
    • Wall cloud-an isolated lowering of the base of a thunderstorm
    • Cloud of debris
    • Large hail
    • Funnel cloud-a visible rotating extension of the cloud base
    • Roaring noise
What should I do if a tornado is threatening?
  • The safest place to be is an underground shelter, basement or safe room.
  • If no underground shelter or safe room is available, a small, windowless interior room or hallway on the lowest level of a sturdy building is the safest alternative.
    • Mobile homes are not safe during tornadoes or other severe winds.
    • Do not seek shelter in a hallway or bathroom of a mobile home.
  • If you have access to a sturdy shelter or a vehicle, abandon your mobile home immediately.
  • Go to the nearest sturdy building or shelter immediately, using your seat belt if driving.
  • Do not wait until you see the tornado.
  • If you are caught outdoors, seek shelter in a basement, shelter or sturdy building. If you cannot quickly walk to a shelter:
    • Immediately get into a vehicle, buckle your seat belt and try to drive to the closest sturdy shelter.
    • If flying debris occurs while you are driving, pull over and park. Now you have the following options as a last resort:
      • Stay in the car with the seat belt on. Put your head down below the windows, covering with your hands and a blanket if possible.
      • If you can safely get noticeably lower than the level of the roadway, exit your car and lie in that area, covering your head with your hands.
    • Your choice should be driven by your specific circumstances.
What do I do after a tornado?
  • Continue listening to local news or a NOAA Weather Radio for updated information and instructions.
  • If you are away from home, return only when authorities say it is safe to do so.
  • Wear long pants, a long sleeved shirt and sturdy shoes when examining your walls, doors, staircases and windows for damage.
  • Watch out for fallen power lines or broken gas lines and report them to the utility company immediately.
  • Stay out of damaged buildings.
  • Use battery powered flashlights when examining buildings—do NOT use candles.
  • If you smell gas or hear a blowing or hissing noise, open a window and get everyone out of the building quickly and call the gas company or fire department.
  • Take pictures of damage, both of the building and its contents, for insurance claims.
  • Use the telephone only for emergency calls.
  • Keep all of your animals under your direct control.
  • Clean up spilled medications, bleaches, gasoline or other flammable liquids that could become a fire hazard.
  • Check for injuries. If you are trained, provide first aid to persons in need until emergency responders arrive.

Is that… rain??

Hey everybody, its raining!  You know what that means… somewhere there are a bunch of very jubilant UCSC students.

I guess it also means your power might go out (due to the wind advisory currently in affect for our county). So, here is our most popular blog post, ever… What to do when your power goes out.  Read it quick.

If your power goes out, here are some steps you can take to keep your family safe.

  • Use a flashlight for emergency lighting. Never use candles.
  • Turn off electrical equipment you were using when the power went out.
  • Avoid opening the refrigerator and freezer to keep your food as fresh as possible.
  • Do not run a generator in an enclosed or partially enclosed space, such as your home, garage, basement, or crawlspace. Never burn charcoal for heating or cooking indoors. Never use your gas range, oven, or dryer as a source of heat.
  • If you use a generator, connect the equipment you want to power directly to the outlets on the generator. Do not connect a generator to a home’s electrical system.
  • Use a portable radio for updated news and weather forecasts.
  • Leave one light on so you know when the power returns.

Everyone can prepare ahead of time for disasters like a power outage by taking the following actions:

  • Build a disaster supplies kit. Your kit should include at least a three-day supply of non-perishable food items and water (one gallon per person per day), a flashlight, a battery-powered or crank radio, as well as batteries, can opener and special items such as medications, diapers, and infant formula.
  • Have a communication plan ready. If you have a telephone that requires electricity to work (such as a cordless phone or answering machine), plan for alternate communication, including having a cellular telephone, radio, or pager.
  • Keep your car fuel tank at least half full because gas stations rely on electricity to power their pumps.
  • Be sure to keep a key to your house with you, in case the garage door does not open. If you have an electric garage door opener, find out where the manual release lever is located and learn how to operate it.
  • Follow energy conservation measures to keep the use of electricity as low as possible.

How to keep food safe during a power outage

Sudden power outages can be frustrating and troublesome, especially when they are prolonged. Perishable foods should not be held above 40 degrees for more than 2 hours. If a power outage is 2 hours or less, you need not be concerned, but how do you save your food when the refrigerator is out for longer times? Being prepared can help. By planning ahead, you can save your perishables.

What do I need?

  • One or more coolers. Inexpensive styrofoam coolers can do an excellent job as well.
  • Shelf-stable foods, such as canned goods and powdered or boxed milk. These can be eaten cold or heated on the grill.
  • A digital quick-response thermometer. A digital thermometer should be a necessity in your kitchen anyway. With these thermometers you can quickly check the internal temperatures of food for doneness and safety.

What to do…

  • Do not open the refrigerator or freezer. Tell your little ones not to open the door. An unopened refrigerator will keep foods cold enough for a couple of hours at least. A freezer that is half full will hold for up to 24 hours and a full freezer for 48 hours.
  • If it looks like the power outage will be for more than 2-4 hours, pack refrigerated milk, dairy products, meats, fish, poultry, eggs, gravy, stuffing and left-overs into your cooler surrounded by ice.
  • If it looks like the power outage will be prolonged, prepare a cooler with ice for your freezer items.See “Power is Out” download guidelines (PDF file)

Q’s and A’s
What should be discarded after a power outage? As soon as the power returns, check temperatures. If the food in the freezer has ice crystals and is not above 40 degrees you can refreeze. Perishable foods in the refrigerator should not be above 40 degrees F. for more than two hours. Use this chart to see what has to be discarded and what can be kept.

What if I go to bed and the power is still not on? Before you go to bed, pack your perishables into your coolers if you haven’t already done so and put in as much ice as you can. Also, when you go to bed, leave a bedroom light switched on. When the power goes back on, it will wake you, so you can check the condition of your foods in the freezer.

What if the power goes out while I’m at work or out of the house and it has been more than a few hours before I get home? Try to determine how long the power has been out. Check the internal temperature of the food in your refrigerator with your quick-response thermometer. A liquid such as milk or juice is easy to check. Spot check other items like steaks or left-overs also. If the internal temperature is above 40 degrees, it is best to throw it out.

What if the power goes out and comes back on while I am out? If your freezer is fairly full and you know it was not longer than 24 hours, the food should be OK. There will be loss of quality with refreezing, but the food will be safe. If the refrigerator was out for more than 2-4 hours, you are best to discard the perishables.

Prepared by Giant Food, Inc., Landover, Maryland, June 1999. Used with permission. Original content adapted from “Help, Power Outage!” Food News for Consumers, Summer 1989, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food Safety and Inspection Service. ARC 1098 September 1999

Frozen Foods
Meat and Mixed Dishes: Still Contains Ice Crystals. Not Above 40° F Thawed, Held Above 40° F For Over 2 Hours
Beef, veal, lamb, pork, poultry, ground meat and poultry Refreeze Discard
Casseroles with meat, pasta, rice, egg or cheese base, stews, soups, convenience foods, pizza Refreeze Discard
Fish, shellfish, breaded seafood products Refreeze Discard
Dairy: Still Contains Ice Crystals. Not Above 40° F Thawed, Held Above 40° F For Over 2 Hours
Milk Refreeze Discard
Eggs (out of shell) egg products Refreeze Discard
Ice cream, frozen yogurt Discard Discard
Cheese (soft and semi soft) cream cheese ricotta Refreeze Discard
Hard cheese (cheddar Swiss parmesan) Refreeze Refreeze
Fruits and Vegetables: Still Contains Ice Crystals. Not Above 40° F Thawed, Held Above 40° F For Over 2 Hours
Fruit Juices Refreeze Refreeze. Discard if mold, yeasty smell or sliminess develops.
Home or commercially packaged fruit Refreeze Refreeze. Discard if mold, yeasty smell or sliminess develops.
Vegetable Juices Refreeze Discard if above 50° for over 8 hours.
Home or commercially packaged or blanched vegetables Refreeze Discard if above 50° for over 8 hours.
Baked Goods Baking Ingredients: Still Contains Ice Crystals. Not Above 40° F Thawed, Held Above 40° F For Over 2 Hours
Fruit Juices Refreeze Refreeze
Flour, cornmeal, nuts Refreeze Refreeze
Pie Crusts, Breads, rolls, muffins, cakes (no custard fillings) Refreeze Discard if above 50° for over 8 hours.
Cakes, pies, pastries with custard or cheese filling, cheesecake Refreeze Discard
Commercial and homemade bread dough Refreeze Refreeze
Refrigerator Foods
Dairy/Eggs/Cheese: Food Still Cold, Held At 40° F Or Above Under 2 Hours Held Above 40° F For Over 2 Hours
Milk, cream, sour cream buttermilk evaporated milk yogurt Keep Discard
Butter, margarine Keep Keep
Baby Formula, opened Keep Discard
Eggs, egg dishes, custards puddings Keep Discard
Hard & processed cheeses Keep Keep
Soft cheeses, cottage cheese Keep Discard
Fruits & Vegetables: Food Still Cold, Held At 40° F Or Above Under 2 Hours Held Above 40° F For Over 2 Hours
Fruit juices, opened; Canned fruits, opened; Fresh fruits Keep Keep
Vegetables, cooked; Vegetable juice opened Keep Discard after 6 hours
Baked potatoes Keep Discard
Fresh mushrooms, herbs spices Keep Keep
Garlic, chopped in oil or buffer Keep Discard
Meat, Poultry, Seafood: Food Still Cold, Held At 40° F Or Above Under 2 Hours Held Above 40° F For Over 2 Hours
Fresh or leftover meat, poultry, fish, or seafood Keep Discard
Lunchmeats, hot dogs, bacon, sausage, dried beef Keep Discard
Canned meats NOT labeled “Keep Refrigerated” but refrigerated after opening Keep Discard
Canned hams labeled “Keep Refrigerated” Keep Discard
Mixed Dishes, Side Dishes: Food Still Cold, Held At 40° F Or Above Under 2 Hours Held Above 40° F For Over 2 Hours
Casseroles, soups, stews, pizza with meat Keep Discard
Meat, tuna, shrimp, chicken, or egg salad Keep Discard
Cooked pasta Pasta salads with mayonnaise or vinegar base Keep Discard
Gravy stuffing Keep Discard
Pies, Breads: Food Still Cold, Held At 40° F Or Above Under 2 Hours Held Above 40° F For Over 2 Hours
Cream or cheese filled pastries and pies Keep Discard
Fruit pies Keep Keep
Breads, rolls, cakes, muffins, quick breads Keep Keep
Refrigerator biscuits, rolls, cookie dough Keep Discard
Sauces, Spreads, Jams: Food Still Cold, Held At 40° F Or Above Under 2 Hours Held Above 40° F For Over 2 Hours
Mayonnaise, tartar sauce, horseradish Keep Discard
Opened salad dressing, jelly, relish, taco and barbeque sauce, mustard, catsup olives Keep Keep

Prepared by Giant Food, Inc., Landover, Maryland, June 1999. Used with permission. Original content adapted from “Help, Power Outage!” Food News for Consumers, Summer 1989, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food Safety and Inspection Service. ARC 1098 September 1999

Storm relief volunteers in the news

Yesterday, the Register-Pajaronian printed this fantastic article, complete with pictures, on the work our volunteers were doing in the county.  Check it out here:

http://www.register-pajaronian.com/fe_view_article.php?story_id=2862&page_id=72&heading=0

PG&E provides their tips for Power Outage Safety

Storm Season Tips and Information from PG&E

During storm season it is important to have the right information on hand for yourself, friends and neighbors. When individuals experience a power outage they should call PG&E’s outage information line at 1-800-PGE-5002 to report the outage and/or to get updates on the power restoration efforts in their area. Calling this line is the most efficient way to get updated outage information.

What you should have in case of a power outage:

– Battery operated radios with fresh batteries ready for updates on storm conditions and power outages.
– Battery operated flashlights with fresh batteries on hand
– A cell phone, or hard-wired, single line telephone. Cordless phones will not work without power.
– PG&E and the American Red Cross recommend that individuals do not use candles because of the risk of fire.
– Fill used liter sized plastic soda bottles with water and place them in the freezer. During an extended outage, transfer them to the refrigerator to prevent food from spoiling. Open the refrigerator only when necessary, keeping warm air out and cool air in. If food is exposed to warm air for an extended length of time, please reffer to the chart below to assess the food’s edibility.
– If you have a generator, call PG&E’s customer service line at 1-800-PGE-5000. Make sure your generator is installed safely and properly. If it is not, you risk damaging your property and endangering yourself and PG&E line workers who may be working on power lines some distance from your home. Information on the safe installation of generators can be found on PG&E’s website: http://www.pge.com/generator.

What you should know in case of a power outage:

– If you see a downed power line, assume that it is “live” or carrying electrical current. Do not touch or try to move it and keep children and animals away. Report downed power lines and other electric emergencies immediately by calling 911 and PG&E’s customer service line at 1-800-PGE-5000.
– If your power goes out, turn off and unplug all electric appliances. When the power is restored, several appliances may turn on at once and overload your circuits. Heat generating appliances left on may pose a fire hazard. Leave a single lamp on to alert you when the power returns.

Information given on behalf of PG&E, Central coast and Southern Santa Clara county, 2008

Santa Cruz Red Cross provides help to powerless

The Santa Cruz County Chapter has been providing a canteen service to those affected by the power outages caused by the massive storm that recently barreled through Santa Cruz County. During a canteen service, Red Cross volunteers drive to affected neighborhoods and distribute food, beverages and other goods. This canteen service includes coffee and tea, hot soup and blankets. Meals are served from the Red Cross Emergency Response Vehicle (ERV), which is clearly identified as an American Red Cross vehicle. Brewed coffee and hot water for tea have been donated by Peet’s Coffee and Tea of Santa Cruz and Starbucks of Scotts Valley.

The chapter is also providing Counseling to those who request it, as well as help with necessary medical needs that have been interrupted by the power outage.

We are asking our community for monetary donations at this time, as our budget has been hard hit by a record number of home fires this year in Santa Cruz County. A donation to the Santa Cruz County Chapter of the American Red Cross will stay in Santa Cruz County and help your local chapter respond to local emergencies year round, from single home fires to massive disasters that affect the entire community. The American Red Cross, Santa Cruz County Chapter is not a government agency, nor do we receive our funding from National Red Cross. We could not perform our lifesaving services if not for the generosity of the people of Santa Cruz County.

Remember, your Red Cross is always available to answer any questions that you may have. Please call us at 831-462-2881.

Stormy weather leaving you in the dark?

The biggest storm that Santa Cruz County has seen in 2 years in bearing down on the central coast threatening flooding, wind damage and power outages.  If your power goes out, here are some steps you can take to keep your family safe.

  • Use a flashlight for emergency lighting. Never use candles.
  • Turn off electrical equipment you were using when the power went out.
  • Avoid opening the refrigerator and freezer to keep your food as fresh as possible.
  • Do not run a generator in an enclosed or partially enclosed space, such as your home, garage, basement, or crawlspace. Never burn charcoal for heating or cooking indoors. Never use your gas range, oven, or dryer as a source of heat.
  • If you use a generator, connect the equipment you want to power directly to the outlets on the generator. Do not connect a generator to a home’s electrical system.
  • Use a portable radio for updated news and weather forecasts.
  • Leave one light on so you know when the power returns.

Everyone can prepare ahead of time for disasters like a power outage by taking the following actions:

  • Build a disaster supplies kit. Your kit should include at least a three-day supply of non-perishable food items and water (one gallon per person per day), a flashlight, a battery-powered or crank radio, as well as batteries, can opener and special items such as medications, diapers, and infant formula.
  • Have a communication plan ready. If you have a telephone that requires electricity to work (such as a cordless phone or answering machine), plan for alternate communication, including having a cellular telephone, radio, or pager.
  • Keep your car fuel tank at least half full because gas stations rely on electricity to power their pumps.
  • Be sure to keep a key to your house with you, in case the garage door does not open. If you have an electric garage door opener, find out where the manual release lever is located and learn how to operate it.
  • Follow energy conservation measures to keep the use of electricity as low as possible.

How to keep food safe during a power outage 

Sudden power outages can be frustrating and troublesome, especially when they are prolonged. Perishable foods should not be held above 40 degrees for more than 2 hours. If a power outage is 2 hours or less, you need not be concerned, but how do you save your food when the refrigerator is out for longer times? Being prepared can help. By planning ahead, you can save your perishables.

What do I need?

  • One or more coolers. Inexpensive styrofoam coolers can do an excellent job as well.
  • Shelf-stable foods, such as canned goods and powdered or boxed milk. These can be eaten cold or heated on the grill.
  • A digital quick-response thermometer. A digital thermometer should be a necessity in your kitchen anyway. With these thermometers you can quickly check the internal temperatures of food for doneness and safety.

What to do…

  • Do not open the refrigerator or freezer. Tell your little ones not to open the door. An unopened refrigerator will keep foods cold enough for a couple of hours at least. A freezer that is half full will hold for up to 24 hours and a full freezer for 48 hours.
  • If it looks like the power outage will be for more than 2-4 hours, pack refrigerated milk, dairy products, meats, fish, poultry, eggs, gravy, stuffing and left-overs into your cooler surrounded by ice.
  • If it looks like the power outage will be prolonged, prepare a cooler with ice for your freezer items.See “Power is Out” download guidelines (PDF file)

Q’s and A’s
What should be discarded after a power outage? As soon as the power returns, check temperatures. If the food in the freezer has ice crystals and is not above 40 degrees you can refreeze. Perishable foods in the refrigerator should not be above 40 degrees F. for more than two hours. Use this chart to see what has to be discarded and what can be kept.

What if I go to bed and the power is still not on? Before you go to bed, pack your perishables into your coolers if you haven’t already done so and put in as much ice as you can. Also, when you go to bed, leave a bedroom light switched on. When the power goes back on, it will wake you, so you can check the condition of your foods in the freezer.

What if the power goes out while I’m at work or out of the house and it has been more than a few hours before I get home? Try to determine how long the power has been out. Check the internal temperature of the food in your refrigerator with your quick-response thermometer. A liquid such as milk or juice is easy to check. Spot check other items like steaks or left-overs also. If the internal temperature is above 40 degrees, it is best to throw it out.

What if the power goes out and comes back on while I am out? If your freezer is fairly full and you know it was not longer than 24 hours, the food should be OK. There will be loss of quality with refreezing, but the food will be safe. If the refrigerator was out for more than 2-4 hours, you are best to discard the perishables.

Prepared by Giant Food, Inc., Landover, Maryland, June 1999. Used with permission. Original content adapted from “Help, Power Outage!” Food News for Consumers, Summer 1989, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food Safety and Inspection Service. ARC 1098 September 1999

Frozen Foods
Meat and Mixed Dishes: Still Contains Ice Crystals. Not Above 40° F Thawed, Held Above 40° F For Over 2 Hours
Beef, veal, lamb, pork, poultry, ground meat and poultry Refreeze Discard
Casseroles with meat, pasta, rice, egg or cheese base, stews, soups, convenience foods, pizza Refreeze Discard
Fish, shellfish, breaded seafood products Refreeze Discard
Dairy: Still Contains Ice Crystals. Not Above 40° F Thawed, Held Above 40° F For Over 2 Hours
Milk Refreeze Discard
Eggs (out of shell) egg products Refreeze Discard
Ice cream, frozen yogurt Discard Discard
Cheese (soft and semi soft) cream cheese ricotta Refreeze Discard
Hard cheese (cheddar Swiss parmesan) Refreeze Refreeze
Fruits and Vegetables: Still Contains Ice Crystals. Not Above 40° F Thawed, Held Above 40° F For Over 2 Hours
Fruit Juices Refreeze Refreeze. Discard if mold, yeasty smell or sliminess develops.
Home or commercially packaged fruit Refreeze Refreeze. Discard if mold, yeasty smell or sliminess develops.
Vegetable Juices Refreeze Discard if above 50° for over 8 hours.
Home or commercially packaged or blanched vegetables Refreeze Discard if above 50° for over 8 hours.
Baked Goods Baking Ingredients: Still Contains Ice Crystals. Not Above 40° F Thawed, Held Above 40° F For Over 2 Hours
Fruit Juices Refreeze Refreeze
Flour, cornmeal, nuts Refreeze Refreeze
Pie Crusts, Breads, rolls, muffins, cakes (no custard fillings) Refreeze Discard if above 50° for over 8 hours.
Cakes, pies, pastries with custard or cheese filling, cheesecake Refreeze Discard
Commercial and homemade bread dough Refreeze Refreeze
Refrigerator Foods
Dairy/Eggs/Cheese: Food Still Cold, Held At 40° F Or Above Under 2 Hours Held Above 40° F For Over 2 Hours
Milk, cream, sour cream buttermilk evaporated milk yogurt Keep Discard
Butter, margarine Keep Keep
Baby Formula, opened Keep Discard
Eggs, egg dishes, custards puddings Keep Discard
Hard & processed cheeses Keep Keep
Soft cheeses, cottage cheese Keep Discard
Fruits & Vegetables: Food Still Cold, Held At 40° F Or Above Under 2 Hours Held Above 40° F For Over 2 Hours
Fruit juices, opened; Canned fruits, opened; Fresh fruits Keep Keep
Vegetables, cooked; Vegetable juice opened Keep Discard after 6 hours
Baked potatoes Keep Discard
Fresh mushrooms, herbs spices Keep Keep
Garlic, chopped in oil or buffer Keep Discard
Meat, Poultry, Seafood: Food Still Cold, Held At 40° F Or Above Under 2 Hours Held Above 40° F For Over 2 Hours
Fresh or leftover meat, poultry, fish, or seafood Keep Discard
Lunchmeats, hot dogs, bacon, sausage, dried beef Keep Discard
Canned meats NOT labeled “Keep Refrigerated” but refrigerated after opening Keep Discard
Canned hams labeled “Keep Refrigerated” Keep Discard
Mixed Dishes, Side Dishes: Food Still Cold, Held At 40° F Or Above Under 2 Hours Held Above 40° F For Over 2 Hours
Casseroles, soups, stews, pizza with meat Keep Discard
Meat, tuna, shrimp, chicken, or egg salad Keep Discard
Cooked pasta Pasta salads with mayonnaise or vinegar base Keep Discard
Gravy stuffing Keep Discard
Pies, Breads: Food Still Cold, Held At 40° F Or Above Under 2 Hours Held Above 40° F For Over 2 Hours
Cream or cheese filled pastries and pies Keep Discard
Fruit pies Keep Keep
Breads, rolls, cakes, muffins, quick breads Keep Keep
Refrigerator biscuits, rolls, cookie dough Keep Discard
Sauces, Spreads, Jams: Food Still Cold, Held At 40° F Or Above Under 2 Hours Held Above 40° F For Over 2 Hours
Mayonnaise, tartar sauce, horseradish Keep Discard
Opened salad dressing, jelly, relish, taco and barbeque sauce, mustard, catsup olives Keep Keep

Prepared by Giant Food, Inc., Landover, Maryland, June 1999. Used with permission. Original content adapted from “Help, Power Outage!” Food News for Consumers, Summer 1989, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food Safety and Inspection Service. ARC 1098 September 1999

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